Its Truth Made Known to Me


I sometimes forget how real the faith of the early Latter-day Saints was. But as I visited Joseph and Emma Smith’s small home at the Priesthood Restoration Site, I was reminded of their sacrifices—and my testimony was strengthened. My parents wanted to go see the Priesthood Restoration Site near the… Continue reading

Instruments of Revelation: Translating the Book of Mormon


The translation of the Book of Mormon was a miracle of modern revelation. When most of us hear the word translation, we think of bilingual dictionaries, conjugation charts, and Google Translate. If we need to verify that something is translated correctly, we might ask a native speaker or someone who… Continue reading

Church History and Doubt: Trusting in the Lord

glasses on top of scriptures

When aspects of Church history raise doubts, study and faith can help us navigate historical facts and lead us to answers. Sometimes learning about Church history can build testimonies, but other times, it can shake them. In his Ensign and Liahona article “Understanding Church History by Study and Faith,” Keith… Continue reading

Emma’s Faith: A Letter to Her Husband

handwritten documents

Despite hard trials and difficult separations from her husband, Emma Smith remained faithful to the Lord. It is well known that Emma Smith was the wife of Joseph Smith, the first president of the Relief Society, and the compiler of the first LDS hymnbook. Yet we don’t often hear her words directly. In… Continue reading

The First Mormon Government: The Council of Fifty

desk with quill and paper

Before Joseph Smith ran for US president, he established an organization in Nauvoo to govern the temporal concerns of the Saints. He called the group “the Council of Fifty.”  I remember the first time I learned about Joseph Smith’s seer stones, polygamous relationships, and other uncomfortable tidbits of Mormon history. I… Continue reading

Sally Randall’s Letters from Nauvoo

Drawing of Joseph Smith in Carthage Jail

Joseph Smith’s death was a heartrending event in Church history. In her letters home, Sally Randall shares her faith-filled perspective of the tragedy. The martyrdom of Joseph Smith on June 27, 1844, was unjust and abhorrent. However, many early Saints did not let Joseph’s death shake their faith. Sally Randall, a woman… Continue reading

Louisa Barnes Pratt: Early Sister Missionary in French Polynesia

tropical flowers

Louisa Barnes Pratt served as one of the first sister missionaries of the Church in French Polynesia.  While her husband was serving a mission in the Society Islands in French Polynesia, Louisa Barnes Pratt was called to join him there as a missionary—along with their four daughters. After receiving the… Continue reading

Joseph Smith’s Seer Stones: Coming to Grips with Troubling Information in Church History

sketch of Joseph Smith showing the golden plates to a group of men

Paradigm shifts can rock our world, but they can also bring greater understanding. Before 1697, Westerners believed the idiom “all swans are white.” But when a Dutch explorer discovered a black swan in Australia, his discovery “instantly demolished an apparent reality while also enabling a new, more informed state of… Continue reading

New Perspectives: Women in Church History

young woman talking and smiling with an older woman

Women throughout the Church’s history have shared new perspectives that we can benefit from today. When we explore the unique voices of women throughout history, we can increase our understanding and change our perceptions. What happens when this refreshing outlook is explored in the context of Church history? In the… Continue reading

Coming to Terms with Polygamy

How can we come to terms with issues like polygamy in the early Church when we do not understand all of God’s reasons for them?   When an angel asked Nephi about a vision he received, Nephi responded, “I know that [God] loveth his children; nevertheless, I do not know… Continue reading